Lose Weight Safely

 

(Image: © Shutterstock/Subbotina Anna)
 

The formula for losing weight is simple: Eat fewer calories than you burn. But the methods of doing this can vary. In truth, there is no one “best” way to lose weight — what works for you might not work for someone else. To get the lowdown on the latest science on weight loss, Live Science conducted a months-long search for the best information. We contacted nearly a dozen experts who have researched weight loss, and looked at the most well-regarded studies of weight loss done to date. Visit https://observer.com/2020/07/nutrisystem-reviews-what-to-know-before-trying-program/ for more information about Nutrisystem.

 

We wanted to know what these studies found and, most importantly, when all the science and evidence were boiled down, what experts recommend for people who would like to shed pounds in a safe, healthy manner. All of the experts emphasized one thing: A person’s approach to weight loss should be one that is enjoyable and can be maintained over the long term. Weight loss shouldn’t be about deprivation, because diets that deprive people of their favorite foods tend to be short-lived, said Dr. Pieter Cohen, an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and general internist at Cambridge Health Alliance. 

“If you make this commitment to lifestyle changes, then maybe five years from now, you’re 10 pounds [4.5 kilograms] lighter,” Cohen said. “If you’re doing crash diets, you would probably be 10 pounds more.”

People should focus on making lifestyle changes — sometimes even small ones, like cutting down on the sugar in coffee — to reduce their overall calorie intake. While these changes might not lead to drastic amounts of weight loss in short periods, they can produce healthy, gradual weight loss that will counter the natural tendency for people to gain weight as they age, Cohen said.

As we’ll describe in detail below, a successful weight loss program usually involves cutting back on your calories, increasing your physical activity and making behavioral changes to help you stick with a diet and exercise regimen over the long term. Overweight can eventually lead to vision or hearing loss, treat the last one with silencil for tinnitus.

 
 
 
 
 
Should you lose weight? Find out below how to calculate your BMI. (Image credit: Shutterstock/Stock-Asso)

Who should lose weight?

Obesity is a growing problem in the United States. Over the past 15 years, the nation’s obesity rate rose by 24 percent (7.2 percentage points) among adults, from 30.5 percent in the years 1999-2000 to 37.7 percent in 2013-2014, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published in November 2015. The adult obesity rate in 2013-2014 was the highest ever for the nation, and equates to more than 78 million people.

The extra pounds come with baggage; they increase the likelihood of many health conditions, including the following:

  • heart disease
  • high blood pressure
  • stroke
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • high cholesterol levels
  • cancer
  • osteoarthritis
  • sleep apnea
  • gallstones

Though science has yet to establish a surefire link between obesity and each health risk, the extra fat tissue seems to be the biggest culprit. More fat in the neck has been tied to sleep apnea, while compounds released by fat cells may increase the chances of developing type 2 diabetes. In addition, the more body fat a person carries, the more blood is needed to provide the tissue with oxygen and nutrients, resulting in higher blood pressure. (On the other hand, losing weight can relieve such burdens on the body, leading to health benefits, including reduced blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar.)

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